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Home » For Authors » Case Studies of HCI in Practice

Upcoming Deadlines

All times are in Anywhere on Earth (AoE) time zone.

Case Studies of HCI in Practice

 

Important Dates

All times are in Anywhere on Earth (AoE) time zone. When the deadline is day D, the last time to submit is when D ends AoE. Check your local time in AoE.

  • Submission deadline: Thursday, October 10, 2024
  • Notification: Thursday, November 28, 2024
  • e-rights completion deadline: Thursday, December 5, 2024
  • Publication-ready deadline:  Thursday, January 9, 2025
  • TAPS Closes: Thursday, January 16, 2025
  • Conference video presentation deadline: Thursday, March 13, 2025

 

Submission Details

 

ACM Selection Process Category

Reviewed
 

Message from the Case Studies Chairs

Case Studies are compelling stories about applied HCI practice that are based on real-world experiences and are instructive and of interest to other community members. Case Studies describe how an HCI related problem was addressed in an applied, real-world setting, explain the challenges experienced and how they were tackled, reflect on the experience, identify what could have been improved, and explain why the Case Study is important to the HCI community.

Case Studies differ from archival research papers in that Case Studies do not need to situate themselves as part of the larger body of academic research. As such, they may not have an extensive literature review or explicitly add to HCI theory within an academic school of thought. Case Studies are not considered academic archival publications and can be republished as appropriate.

Based on the concrete research and design cases they describe, Case Studies enable HCI practitioners and researchers to learn how they can apply HCI principles and methods in practical HCI work. Case Studies may inform and inspire HCI practitioners about new approaches, tools, or specific domains and/or encourage HCI researchers to investigate further issues that arise from practical research and design work. Case Studies might focus on topics such as:

  • Pilot studies that precede and inform larger-scale investigations
  • Learnings from real-world applications of an HCI-related method, theory, concept, process, or framework
  • Innovation through research or design
  • Design to support a specific type of experience, discussing its rationale and the lessons learned
  • Research about a specific domain, user group, or experience, discussing the lessons learned
  • The leadership, management, or strategy of research and design in organizations
  • Practical issues associated with HCI teaching and learning in education, training, or knowledge sharing

Importantly, Case Studies need to make a contribution beyond the study itself. A writeup of a single usability study, for example, would not be a Case Study.

 

Preparing and Submitting Your Case Study

A Case Study must be submitted via the PCS Submission System. Your Case Study submission must have a paper and can also have supplementary material.

  1. Paper. The primary submission is an Extended Abstract in the ACM Primary Article Submission Templates format (single column; 4-10 pages excluding references). The paper must contain an abstract or summary of your project (150 words) that includes a synopsis of the lessons learned. The paper should then describe your experience, focusing on the lessons you want readers to take away from your experience. As your paper must stand alone, readers must be able to understand your Case Study by only reading your paper.
  2. Supplementary material (optional). Additional supporting materials can include survey materials, experimental protocols, source code, data, or interactive media.

 

Metadata Integrity

All submission metadata, including required fields in PCS like author names, affiliations, and order, must be complete and correct by the submission deadline. This information is crucial to the integrity of the review process and author representation. The submission deadline is a hard deadline for listing all author names; there are no exceptions. Changes to the order of authors are allowed only during the Publication-Ready submission phase. Minor changes to the title and abstract are permitted during the Publication-Ready submission phase.

 

Policy on Use of Large Language Models

Text generated from a large-scale language model (LLM), such as ChatGPT, must be clearly marked where such tools are used for purposes beyond editing the author’s own text. Please carefully review the April 2023 ACM Policy on Authorship before you use these tools. The SIGCHI blog post describes approaches to acknowledging the use of such tools and we refer to it for guidance. Note that the LaTeX template will default to hiding the Acknowledgements section while in review mode – please make sure that any LLM disclosure is available in your submitted version. While we do not anticipate using tools on a large scale to detect LLM-generated text, we will investigate submissions brought to our attention and desk reject papers where LLM use is not clearly marked.

 

Policy on Research Involving Human Participants and Subjects

Any research in submitted manuscripts that involves human subjects must go through the appropriate ethics review requirements that apply to the authors’ research environment. As research environments vary considerably with regards to their requirements, authors are asked to submit a short note to reviewers that provides this context. Please also see the 2021 ACM Publications policy on research involving humans before submitting.

 

Accessibility

Accessible submissions are essential for reviewers and are good practice. Authors are expected to follow SIGCHI’s Guide to an Accessible Submission. If you have any questions or concerns about creating accessible submissions, please contact the Accessibility Chairs at accessibility@chi2025.acm.org early in the writing process (the closer to the deadline, the less time the team will have to respond to individual requests).

 

Selection Process

The Case Studies selection process does not follow the strict peer-review process that is used for full Papers. Each submission will be evaluated by up to three reviewers, but authors should not expect to have detailed reviews. Reviewers will be instructed to evaluate the submission based on its significance to the field of HCI practice. Specifically, reviewers will evaluate the extent to which the submission:

  • describes a real-world experience of HCI practice that will be instructive and of interest to other members of the HCI community
  • reflects on the experience and describes why the Case Study is of importance
  • advances the state of the practice
  • clearly outlines any limitations of the experience, and its outcomes or findings

Submissions that do not use the ACM Master Article Submission Templates (single column), exceed the allowable page length, do not describe the use of an HCI practice in the real-world, or are of a length that is incommensurate with their contribution will be desk rejected without external review.

Accepted submissions are selected not only based on the quality of the outcomes they describe, but also on their merits and contributions. This means that a valuable lesson learned from a poor outcome is just as acceptable as a valuable lesson learned from a good outcome.

Your submission materials should not contain any sensitive, private, or proprietary information that cannot be disclosed at publication time. Submissions must not be anonymous, however, the confidentiality of submissions will be maintained during the selection process. All rejected submissions will be kept confidential. The materials that were submitted for accepted submissions will be kept confidential until the conference proceedings are published. The exception to this is the title and author information, which will be published on the CHI website and as part of the interactive program before the conference.

 

Upon Acceptance of your Submission

The corresponding author of a conditionally accepted Case Study must follow the instructions (link tba) for preparing and submitting a final version by the publication-ready deadline. If the authors do not meet these requirements by the publication-ready deadline, the Case Study chairs may be required to remove the paper from the conference program. The publication-ready version must use the provided LaTeX, Overleaf, or Word from ACM. Should you need technical assistance, please contact the Publications Chairs at publications@chi2025.acm.org.

 

Video Presentations

All accepted authors are required to upload a video presentation (a presentation video of your accepted work) by the video presentation deadline of Thursday March 13, 2025. See technical requirements for video content at CHI as a guidance for preparing a video presentation. Accepted authors will receive the details of video presentations separately.

If authors fail to submit their video presentations by the deadline, their accepted work would be withdrawn from the ACM Digital Library.

Unlike previous years, CHI 2025 has decided NOT to collect video previews (30-second videos to show the core idea of your work), and authors do not need to prepare them.

 

At the Conference

Authors of accepted Case Studies are required to present their work at CHI 2025, and the presenting author must register for their presentations. Those who cannot attend in-person will have the option to present remotely with a virtual registration rate. Further instructions regarding the presentation of the work will be shared closer to the conference dates. If authors fail to participate in presenting their work, their accepted work would be withdrawn from the ACM Digital Library.

 

After the Conference

Accepted Case Studies will be published as CHI Extended Abstracts in the ACM Digital Library.

 

Best Case Study Recognition

The SIGCHI “Best of CHI” awards honor exceptional submissions to SIGCHI sponsored conferences. Based on reviewer recommendations, the CHI Case Study chairs nominate submissions for the Best Case Study Recognition award.

Case Study papers that were recognized for their excellence at previous CHI conferences include:

  • Riku Arakawa and Hiromu Yakura. 2023. AI for human assessment: What do professional assessors need? In Extended Abstracts of the 2023 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI EA ’23). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, Article 378, 1–7. https://doi.org/10.1145/3544549.3573849
  • Duri Long. 2023. Conducting Remote Design Research on Embodied, Collaborative Museum Exhibits. In Extended Abstracts of the 2023 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI EA ’23). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, Article 379, 1–8. https://doi.org/10.1145/3544549.3573842
  • Hope Schroeder, Rob Tokanel, Kyle Qian, and Khoi Le. 2023. Location-based AR for Social Justice: Case Studies, Lessons, and Open Challenges. In Extended Abstracts of the 2023 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI EA ’23). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, Article 391, 1–10. https://doi.org/10.1145/3544549.3573855
  • Rod Dickinson, Nathan Semertzidis, and Florian Floyd Mueller. 2022. Machine In The Middle: Exploring Dark Patterns of Emotional Human-Computer Integration Through Media Art. In Extended Abstracts of the 2022 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI EA ’22). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, Article 43, 1–7. https://doi.org/10.1145/3491101.3503555
  • Sarah Hanses and Jennifer Wang. 2022. How Do Users Interact with AI Features in the Workplace? Understanding the AI Feature User Journey in Enterprise. In Extended Abstracts of the 2022 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI EA ’22). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, Article 36, 1–7. https://doi.org/10.1145/3491101.3503567
  • Ellen Jiang, Kristen Olson, Edwin Toh, Alejandra Molina, Aaron Donsbach, Michael Terry, and Carrie J Cai. 2022. PromptMaker: Prompt-based Prototyping with Large Language Models. In Extended Abstracts of the 2022 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI EA ’22). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, Article 35, 1–8. https://doi.org/10.1145/3491101.3503564
  • Carrie J Cai, Samantha Winter, David Steiner, Lauren Wilcox, and Michael Terry. 2021. Onboarding Materials as Cross-functional Boundary Objects for Developing AI Assistants. In Extended Abstracts of the 2021 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI EA ’21). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, Article 43, 1–7. https://doi.org/10.1145/3411763.3443435
  • Paulo Reis, John D Lees-Miller, and Sven Laqua. 2021. Merging SaaS Products In A User-Centered Way — A Case Study of Overleaf and ShareLaTeX. In Extended Abstracts of the 2021 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI EA ’21). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, Article 64, 1–8. https://doi.org/10.1145/3411763.3443455
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